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C H Spurgeon

The Suffering Letters

Currently out of print

                These remarkable letters, written from a suffering pastor to his congregation, abound in exhortations to godliness, zeal and prayer. They provide a unique insight into Spurgeon’s life, and into the fervent soul-winning activity which was, alongside the preaching, a leading feature of an historic Calvinistic church.

Notes on Spurgeon’s ministry set the letters in context, and several classic sermonettes written during sickness are included, along with 16 pages of colour pictures of original letters.

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Sunlight for Cloudy Days

Fourteen heartwarming messages to encourage and challenge drawn mainly from prayer meeting addresses, with some from Sunday sermons, given at the Metropolitan Tabernacle.

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Classic Counsels - Soul-Stirring Topics from the Finest Messages of the Prince of Preachers

These choice messages cover aspects of personal spiritual experience together with Christian responsibilities, in Spurgeon's distinctively compelling and uplifting style.

Meeting, these edited messages have been slightly abridged, and punctuation has been modernised.

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Wonders of Grace - Original testimonies of converts during Spurgeon's early years

Drawn from the early years of Spurgeon’s remarkable London ministry, these 138 testimonies of conversion form part of an archive of some 15,000 such accounts at the Metropolitan Tabernacle. Here is a powerful reaffirmation of the transforming power of the Gospel in individual lives. Also provides insights into the signs of conversion looked for by the elders, and the questions put to converts.

Here too is a fascinating glimpse into life in Victorian London, with accounts of servants, crossing sweepers, hatters and factory workers, artisans and middle class converts, brimming with social interest.

Illustrated with facsimile pages of notes by C H Spurgeon and elders, and photographs of London life at that time.

Read some example testimonies in the article Tabernacle Conversions in 1860.

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